Learning
Core subjects

Religious Education  

The Year 9 Religious Education curriculum is developed from To Know, Worship and Love, a Religious Education Curriculum for Catholic School in the Archdiocese of Melbourne. The curriculum is designed so that students can explore, understand and come to know the essential elements of the Christian tradition. Deep understanding and knowing often comes through experience so while students learn about prayer, reflection, sacramental and liturgical life opportunities to experience these are given to students. The positive commitment and respectful attitude to the Religious Education program of the College is a central part of the enrolment pledge agreed to by both student and parent. A social justice placement is part of the Year 9 RE program.  

Areas of Study  

Scripture study, prayer and liturgy participation are incorporated into each unit of study.

Unit 1 Who and/or what leads to an understanding of a ‘Good Life’
Explores qualities and actions of individuals through case studies
Examines what Christian faith teaches about living a blessed life
Unit 2 What prevents a ‘Good Life’
Explores the complexities of good verses evil
Examines the nature of suffering
Faith as a way to combat temptation
Unit 3 Enriching the ‘Good Life’
Reflections on life events
Develop an intimate knowledge of Jesus / to know Jesus intimately
Our gifts; how to enrich the life of others
Trust in God and our beliefs

Assessment  

  • Extended response / essay responses
  • Class activities
  • Recorded research activities using iPads  


Community Connections  

There are 3 key themes in the teaching of Catholic Social Justice:  

  • Human Dignity  
  • Solidarity  
  • Common Good  

For one whole term our students engage in Religious Education out in the community.   

Spending time with and contributing to communities of people with disability, communities of the elderly, and communities of people who are socially disconnected, our students experience and learn - in living, practical terms - what these 3 ideas actually mean.

Assessment  

  • How to Lead a Good Life
  • Community Connections
  • Semester examination

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English

At Year 9, English focuses on critical thinking, informed decision making, public speaking and creative writing. Students study and analyse texts which raise topical issues. Skills in written analysis, and critical thinking and writing are developed. Students learn to tackle controversial topics through thorough research and discussion, guiding them towards presenting their own clear opinions. Using a broad range of examples and models, students develop their creative writing skills. They work on vocabulary enrichment, complex sentence structuring and the drafting and editing of their written pieces. Students are given a variety of opportunities to present their ideas in oral form, both in person and using multimodal form.


Reading and viewing  

Students analyse the ways that text structures can be manipulated for effect. They analyse and explain how images, vocabulary choices and language features distinguish the work of individual authors. They evaluate and integrate ideas and information from texts to form their own interpretations. They select evidence from the text to analyse and explain how language choices and conventions are used to influence an audience.       


Writing  

Students understand how to use a variety of language features to create different levels of meaning. They understand how interpretations can vary by comparing their responses to texts to the responses of others. In creating texts, students demonstrate how manipulating language features and images can create innovative texts. They create texts that respond to issues and interpret and integrate ideas from other texts. They edit for effect, selecting vocabulary and grammar that contribute to the precision and persuasiveness of texts and also apply the conventions of correct spelling and punctuation.       


Speaking and listening  

Students listen for ways texts position an audience. They understand how to use a variety of language features to create different levels of meaning in their own spoken texts. In creating oral texts, students demonstrate an understanding of audience and register. They adapt their content to suit the audience and purpose of their oral texts. They are encouraged to contribute actively to class and group discussions, comparing and evaluating responses to ideas and issues.

Assessment

  • Writing Folio
  • Text Responses
  • Oral Presentation
  • Semester Exam

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Geography

Course Description

The  Geography course at Year 9 includes two main areas of study: ‘Biomes and Food Security’ and ‘Geographies of Interconnections’. Students will investigate the interaction of human activities with the natural environment through a study of various ecosystems (biomes), sustainability, technology and industry. Students will also explore a range of topics including: poverty, links between food, hunger and technology and the social and economic consequences of development in creating rapidly growing cities, mega cities, informal settlements and rural depopulation. They will develop skills to evaluate the factors contributing to the development of these issues, identify strategies to address them and explore ways of managing them. Students undertake a field investigation in the local area to gather, collate, analyse and evaluate data relating to natural and developed environments. They will use evidence from the fieldwork site to explain and predict the effects of natural processes and human activities on the environment, including consideration of the ways people respond to change. Students will apply geographical techniques, including representation of multivariable data and complex mapping operations, to interpret environmental change and research, discriminate, evaluate and present arguments using electronic and other formats.

Areas of Study

  • Causes and consequences of change in places and environments and how this change can be managed.
  • The future implications of changes to places and environments.
  • Why interconnections and independencies are important for the future of places and environments.

 

Standards

Geographic knowledge and understanding

Students begin to explain the operation of a major natural system and its interaction with human activities. They start to evaluate the consequences of the interaction and develop a policy to address an issue related to it. Students work towards describing global patterns of development from a range of perspectives and identify and describe the factors that determine these patterns. They learn to analyse development issues and formulate and evaluate comprehensive policies, including those for sustainable use and management of resources, to alter development patterns at a range of scales. They begin to use evidence based on their inquiries and geographical language and concepts.

Geospatial skills

Students work towards accurately interpreting information on different types of maps and photographs at a range of scales, and using map evidence to support explanations, draw inferences and predict associated outcomes. They begin to collect and collate information gathered from fieldwork observations and present their findings observing geographical presentation conventions.

Assessment

  • Biome Investigation Report
  • Global Food Security Analysis
  • Interconnections Fieldtrip Assignment
  • Examination

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History - The Making of the Modern World

Subject Description

The  History course at Year 9 covers three main areas of study: The Industrial Revolution and how new ideas and technological developments contributed to change, the early history of Australia (1750-1918) including the effects of contact (intended and unintended) between European settlers in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples, the living and working conditions in Australia around the turn of the twentieth century and key events and ideas in the development of Australian self-government and democracy. Students will also investigate key aspects of World War I (1914-1918) and the Australian experience of the war.

Areas of Study  

  • Industrial Revolution
  • Making a Nation
  • World War 1 


Historical Skills  

Use chronological sequencing to demonstrate the relationship between events and developments in different periods and places.

Use historical terms and concepts

Identify, locate and evaluate relevant sources, using ICT and other methods

Process and synthesise information from a range of sources for use as evidence in an historical argument

Evaluate the reliability and usefulness of primary and secondary sources

Identify and analyse different historical perspectives and interpretations (including their own)

Select and use a range of communication forms (oral, digital, graphic, written)

Write clearly structured essays using a range of evidence to support an argument

History Achievement Standard

By the end of Level 9, students refer to key events and the actions of individuals and groups to explain patterns of change and continuity over time. They analyse the causes and effects of events and developments and make judgments about their importance. They explain the motives and actions of people at the time, the significance of events and developments over the short and long term and different interpretations of the past. Students sequence events and developments within a chronological framework, with reference to periods of time and their duration. When researching, students develop different kinds of questions to frame an historical inquiry. They interpret, process, analyse and organise information from a range of primary and secondary sources and use it as evidence to answer inquiry questions. Students examine sources to compare different points of view. When evaluating these sources, they analyse origin and purpose, and draw conclusions about their usefulness. They develop their own interpretations about the past. Students develop texts, particularly explanations and discussions, incorporating historical interpretations, organising and presenting their conclusions, use historical terms and concepts and reference sources used.

 

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Mathematics

In Year 9 Mathematics, the skills and knowledge acquired in many of the topics studied in Years 7 and 8 Mathematics is consolidated and extended. Some new areas of Mathematics are also explored. Enquiry and problem solving is encouraged in every topic.

While most students will follow the Mainstream pathway, there are two other pathways in Year 9 Mathematics and enrolment in one of these classes is by invitation only. Modified Mathematics is a small class for students who find this subject very challenging. Here the students benefit from receiving more of the teacher’s time and a curriculum and pace of learning which better suits them. In Accelerated Mathematics, students are stimulated and challenged by studying some extra topics from the Year 10 Curriculum.

Areas of Study

  • Pythagoras’ Theorem
  • Algebra
  • Indices
  • Financial Mathematics
  • Measurement
  • Linear Relationships
  • Linear Graphs
  • Probability
  • Trigonometry

 

Assessment

  • Topic tests
  • Application tasks
  • Investigations.
  • Semester examination
     

Y9 Pathways in Mathematics

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Science

By the end of Year 9, students explain chemical processes and natural radioactivity in terms of atoms and energy transfers and describe examples of important chemical reactions. They describe models of energy transfer and apply these to explain phenomena. They explain global features and events in terms of geological processes and timescales. They analyse how biological systems function and respond to external changes with reference to interdependencies, energy transfers and flows of matter. They describe social and technological factors that have influenced scientific developments and predict how future applications of science and technology may affect people’s lives.  Students design questions that can be investigated using a range of inquiry skills. They design methods that include the control and accurate measurement of variables and systematic collection of data and describe how they considered ethics and safety. They analyse trends in data, identify relationships between variables and reveal inconsistencies in results. They analyse their methods and the quality of their data, and explain specific actions to improve the quality of their evidence. They evaluate others’ methods and explanations from a scientific perspective and use appropriate language and representations when communicating their findings and ideas to specific audiences.  

Students design questions that can be investigated using a range of inquiry skills. They design methods that include the control and accurate measurement of variables and systematic collection of data and describe how they considered ethics and safety. They analyse trends in data, identify relationships between variables and reveal inconsistencies in results. They analyse their methods and the quality of their data, and explain specific actions to improve the quality of their evidence. They evaluate others’ methods and explanations from a scientific perspective and use appropriate language and representations when communicating their findings and ideas to specific audiences.  

Strands 

  • Science Understanding      
  • Science Inquiry Skills  


Areas of Study

Semester 1 Semester 2  
Inside the Atom
Electrical Energy
Ecosystems 
Body Balance
Light
Everyday Reactions 

 

Assessment  

  • Practical Reports
  • Test
  • Research Assignments
  • Practical Tests
  • Semester Examination